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David Moore

Creative Director

David Moore
Creative Director

OMAHA, NE

I distinctly remember following the May 6, 1975, tornado from the back seat of a police car, listening to the damage reports as they happened. Do I count freelance drag race photographer as my first job? I was 14.
 
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA – LINCOLN

The first time I walked into the library, I looked around in awe and realized how much I would never know.

I received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism as an advertising major, without a clue as to what an advertising career was really about.

Right after graduation, I took a job as an account executive for the Omaha World-Herald. My job was to sell $22/column inch newspaper advertising in Council Bluffs and compete against the local paper selling for $6/column inch. My only reliable clientele were businesses selling what you couldn’t buy in Omaha – adult book/novelty stores, XXX theaters and strip clubs. I lasted seven months, then leaped at the chance to move to KETV Omaha as a writer and producer. The strip clubs were tough competitors.
 
BOZELL & JACOBS – COPYWRITER

I was still at KETV Omaha when, on a whim, I called the GM of the Bozell & Jacobs ag division. I went to lunch with Chet Frazier who put me in contact with the copy chief, who asked me to write an ad for Paymaster Seeds as an assignment. After turning it in, I realized I made a typo. I called, apologizing and asking if I could submit my edited assignment. They let me make the change, and from what I know now, I think that was a step in the right direction. Because it’s one thing to make a mistake, but another to own it.

I once helped two Secret Service snipers find their way to the roof. George Bush was running for President and staying at the Marriott across from our then-office.

It would take their entire advertising budget to produce, but we decided to show our client Vise Grip our idea for their television commercial anyway. They liked it so much they agreed to put all of their budget into production. Then, even production companies started competing for the job; the big idea was that good. One company in London said, “Just tell us what you want, we’ll do it whatever the price.”

I could tell a lot of stories. Like once we recorded a radio spot with William Sanderson. At one point, I asked if he could sound a little less like a hick. Sanderson responded, “You hire William Sanderson, you get William Sanderson.” Noted.
 
LIGGETT STASHOWER – EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I was part of the management team trying to buy back Bozell from IPG, but then I got an unexpected phone call, and consequently, a too-good-to-pass-up offer from Liggett Stashower in Ohio. I decided to take it.

I was named president of the agency, led new business focus in the building products category and within two years national brands were coming to us. We didn’t have to pursue them. Heady times.

Liquid Wrench lacked brand awareness and cohesive relationships between products, so we knew they needed more than a multimedia advertising campaign. We re-hauled the brand, sales skyrocketed – some up 106.4 percent – and we were even featured in the New York Times.

The campaign proved that great advertising is more than simply making ads. Great advertising finds insights, pinpoints core problems and offers solutions that benefit both client and consumer.
 
BOZELL – CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I always wanted to come back to Omaha. When the agency in Cleveland was hit hard by the economic collapse of 2008 and succumbed to an owner’s tug of war, my wife and I figured the agency was the only reason we’d gone to Cleveland in the first place. So, we moved to Omaha, and a few months later my friends at Bozell reached out looking for a new creative director. Timing was perfect. I’m excited to be back where I began, building our creative team and mentoring young talent. It’s great to be home again.
 
Words to live by: Don’t believe your own bullshit.

David's story

OMAHA, NE

I distinctly remember following the May 6, 1975, tornado from the back seat of a police car, listening to the damage reports as they happened. Do I count freelance drag race photographer as my first job? I was 14.
 
UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA – LINCOLN

The first time I walked into the library, I looked around in awe and realized how much I would never know.

I received a Bachelor of Arts in journalism as an advertising major, without a clue as to what an advertising career was really about.

Right after graduation, I took a job as an account executive for the Omaha World-Herald. My job was to sell $22/column inch newspaper advertising in Council Bluffs and compete against the local paper selling for $6/column inch. My only reliable clientele were businesses selling what you couldn’t buy in Omaha – adult book/novelty stores, XXX theaters and strip clubs. I lasted seven months, then leaped at the chance to move to KETV Omaha as a writer and producer. The strip clubs were tough competitors.
 
BOZELL & JACOBS – COPYWRITER

I was still at KETV Omaha when, on a whim, I called the GM of the Bozell & Jacobs ag division. I went to lunch with Chet Frazier who put me in contact with the copy chief, who asked me to write an ad for Paymaster Seeds as an assignment. After turning it in, I realized I made a typo. I called, apologizing and asking if I could submit my edited assignment. They let me make the change, and from what I know now, I think that was a step in the right direction. Because it’s one thing to make a mistake, but another to own it.

I once helped two Secret Service snipers find their way to the roof. George Bush was running for President and staying at the Marriott across from our then-office.

It would take their entire advertising budget to produce, but we decided to show our client Vise Grip our idea for their television commercial anyway. They liked it so much they agreed to put all of their budget into production. Then, even production companies started competing for the job; the big idea was that good. One company in London said, “Just tell us what you want, we’ll do it whatever the price.”

I could tell a lot of stories. Like once we recorded a radio spot with William Sanderson. At one point, I asked if he could sound a little less like a hick. Sanderson responded, “You hire William Sanderson, you get William Sanderson.” Noted.
 
LIGGETT STASHOWER – EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I was part of the management team trying to buy back Bozell from IPG, but then I got an unexpected phone call, and consequently, a too-good-to-pass-up offer from Liggett Stashower in Ohio. I decided to take it.

I was named president of the agency, led new business focus in the building products category and within two years national brands were coming to us. We didn’t have to pursue them. Heady times.

Liquid Wrench lacked brand awareness and cohesive relationships between products, so we knew they needed more than a multimedia advertising campaign. We re-hauled the brand, sales skyrocketed – some up 106.4 percent – and we were even featured in the New York Times.

The campaign proved that great advertising is more than simply making ads. Great advertising finds insights, pinpoints core problems and offers solutions that benefit both client and consumer.
 
BOZELL – CREATIVE DIRECTOR

I always wanted to come back to Omaha. When the agency in Cleveland was hit hard by the economic collapse of 2008 and succumbed to an owner’s tug of war, my wife and I figured the agency was the only reason we’d gone to Cleveland in the first place. So, we moved to Omaha, and a few months later my friends at Bozell reached out looking for a new creative director. Timing was perfect. I’m excited to be back where I began, building our creative team and mentoring young talent. It’s great to be home again.
 
Words to live by: Don’t believe your own bullshit.

Read More

years in industry

38 years

years at bozell

22 years

client experience

  • Sioux Honey
  • Greater Omaha Packing
  • Cue Broadway

David's Hometown

Omaha, NE

May 16, 2018

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David says

Great advertising finds insights, pinpoints core problems and offers solutions that benefit both client and consumer.

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